food justice

Oct
9

Olivia Chow supports Food Nation platform

Mayoral candidate Olivia Chow has announced support for Food Nation and the food justice campaign's five point platform. The campaign has engaged residents and candidates in all parts of Toronto and asks politicians to reverse growing poverty and food inacessibility in Toronto.

"I believe that working with Food Forward and the Food Nation Toronto platform," said Chow in a letter, "we can help include more people and help alleviate poverty in our city."

"I support places to grow healthy food in our communities using city land, community gardens, and I have specifically committed to seeing lands around residential towers in our city invigorated with food markets and community gardens. "

She continues, highlighting from her platform:

"We have 29% child poverty in the city and I am pledging to help alleviate this hunger with 36,000 more healthy breakfasts a week."

Food Forward's Food Justice Committee thanks Ms. Chow for her support and commitments. We hope to see other leading mayoral candidates endorse Food Nation with a commitment to significant results in improving food access, jobs and capacity by 2018.

In the 2010 election, leading mayoral candidates' released platforms with solutions on food access, job creation, and urban agriculture. Many council candidates also pledged support to start food initiatives with their communities, many of which have been started since that time. In this election, dozens of Council candidates have endorsed the Food Nation platform.

Candidates and Torontonians are encouarged to get involved, review the platform, and continue to build support, by making an endorsement at: 

www.foodnationTO.com

Jul
14

Food Nation is here

Help us change the channel from Ford to Food!

Can you attend our Food Nation meetup and volunteer training Tuesday, July 15th? Learn more. Hundreds of Torontonians have already signed on as part of Food Nation. Help us reach even further.

Explore where Food Nation has been, endorse our platform, and share our proposals for change:

foodnationTO.com

A campaign by Food Forward's Food Justice Committee.

Apr
15

Fruit trees and Food Nation at #SummerFoodKickoff

Do you think Toronto's next Mayor and Council should create a better city through food?

Food Forward is presenting Food Nation! This time at the University of Toronto as part of the #SummerFoodKickoff with our partners.

Come learn about the movement that brings Food Justice to Toronto and find out ways to get involved in the most exciting election campaign in Toronto at out Food Nation Town Hall

What: Learn about food justice and how to tackle it in Toronto. Discuss and get involved.

When: 1-2PM Friday April 25th

Where: East Common Room, Hart House (7 Hart House Circle/Harbord Street)

Let people know you're coming!
Spread the word on Twitter (#FoodNationTO), Facebook, and endorse our platform, volunteer or donate: Join Food Nation.

But Wait, there's more!

A very exciting project from our partners at Transition Toronto...

Treemobile is pretty much the day-time version of the Batmobile. Instead of delivering rough street justice, it delivers food justice and climate justice. Instead of seeking revenge on crime, it’s working toward repairing damage done by December’s ice storm. 

Through Transition Toronto’s Treemobile project, Torontonians with a place to plant can order food-bearing trees and shrubs online and the Treemobile will deliver them on the weekend of April 26th*. 

With just a few clicks, you can have a plant that will provide you with delicious apples, cherries, pears, raspberries, goji berries, hazelnuts, plums, or any of the other varieties available. The Treemobile website also provides guidance on which plants are appropriate for your situation, and how to give your plant the best chance of growing from infancy to food-bearing maturity. 

Aside from providing you with beautiful, tasty food, the Treemobile project has plenty of benefits for you and Toronto. Bearing locally produced food means fewer food miles and lower grocery bills. As saplings and young shrubs ready to grow, the plants delivered will take carbon dioxide out of the air and store it where it’s not going to harm alter the climate. Trees can also shade and cool properties, reducing summer air conditioning bills, and new trees are just what Toronto needs to replace some of the beautiful tree canopy that was lost in the ice storm. Left over Treemobile stock will be donated to community properties to provide food for all. Treemobile is great for you, for Toronto’s environment, and for Toronto communities. It’s everything Transition Toronto wants a project to be.

The Treemobile project is designed to minimize cost barriers, with the most expensive item being $42, and the least being $5. (DON’T FORGET TO CHOOSE A DELIVERY OPTION, at most an additional $5 charge, with pick-up being free!). This is not a for-profit project. We just want to see more trees in the ground and more accessible, local, healthful food in Toronto.

If you want to see the same, and want your own extremely local food, go to www.transitiontreemobile.org and choose the right plant for you. 

*If the planting site is in the delivery zone. Otherwise, plants can be picked up at one of three locations in Toronto. Also, if the ground doesn’t de-frost early enough, delivery may occur on the weekend of May 3rd.

Mar
31

Letter to City Council on street food decision

As residents of Toronto who are founders of new organizations, small businesses and non-profits involved in the City’s growing food movement, we want to write in support of opening up Toronto’s street food. We are some of the little guys in food doing new things, and helping others to start small businesses and create opportunities


We've often seen entrepreneurs face City rules that hinder rather than help us to create opportunities and jobs. That’s why it is exciting to see new street food policies that would finally harmonize by-laws across the City to allow for easier access to sell diverse food. Until now, there’s been nothing but red tape.

 

We hope to see policies that allow new street food adopted at this week’s Council meeting based on the street food study approved at Licensing and Standards Committee. But we have two concerns:


A) The proposals keep a moratorium on any new food carts downtown, and B) they allow a single complaint to immediately deny a new food truck or cart, with appeals going to Community Council.

 

Many of the new vendors we work with won’t be in a place to spend tens of thousands on a food truck. Meanwhile, residents, workers and tourists downtown want opportunities to try diverse foods, more than hot dogs, on the street. Torontonians are making incredible food. Young people and new Canadians should have the opportunity to start with a business with a cart and provide good food at good prices.

 

Since new trucks and carts already have to be a significant distance from restaurants, there should be a clear process for them that doesn’t lead to denial of approval after one objection. The proposed process with a denial being sent to appeal at community council would create time and headaches for everyone.

 

Therefore, we are asking that councillors amend the staff report as follows:

A)   11. That City Council lift the moratorium on R53 Sidewalk Vending Permits for all food vendors in wards 20, 27 and 28.That in these wards the City allow up to 20 new vendor permits to be issued for the 2014 season.

B)   Chapter 740, Street Vending - Article II and Article III

That a notification of objection does not lead to a refusal of the application by the Executive Director. That Licensing and Standards will devise a process with clear and reasonable grounds for denial of permits that reflects issues of space, mobility, sanitation and related issues that can be studied by staff and reported to the applicant and objector, with opportunity for dialogue, amendments and an appeal process.


Thank you for hearing our voice on this issue. Please feel free to contact us with any questions on the matter, or ideas to create a better City through food.


Sincerely,


Hassel Aviles, Founder, Toronto Underground Market

Hillary Connolly, Founder, Food/Craft

Sang Kim, Founder, Yakitori Bar and Seoul Food Co. and Windup Bird Cafe

Evis Chirowamhangu, Founder, Mnandi Pies

Vanessa Yu, Founder, FoodSpokes and CaterToronto

Paola Solorzano, Co-Founder, Santo Pecado

Adriana Pelayo Rubio, Co-Founder, Santo Pecado

Jonathan Mikhail, Co-Founder, Fourcorners Culinary Concourse Inc.

Catherine Carriere, Co-Founder, Fourcorners Culinary Concourse Inc.

Henry Faber, Co-Founder, Bento Miso

Jennie Faber, Co-Founder, Bento Miso

Darcy Higgins, Founder, Food Forward